Teach Yourself D3.js

D3 is a JavaScript framework used for data visualization.
Learning how to work with D3.js is very easy. If you begin with the basics, you’ll see how easy it is to use D3, because:

  • the DOM function names are much shorter than those in the legacy DOM library.
  • the same functions are used for both setting and getting values.
  • setters return a value, so you can keep working with the same element without repeating its name.

If you already know some framework, you probably feel that there’s nothing new under the sun, which is good because it makes learning the new stuff easier.

So, What’s New?

In D3, you can:
* add and remove SVG and HTML elements using the setters and getter.
* set and get the element’s properties, attributes, styles, text and… data

Getting Started

First, download the framework from http://d3js.org
After you include it in your script, you can use selections, that is wrappers for elements.
To get a selection, use one of the functions:

  • d3.select(selector) – to select the first element matching selector.
  • d3.selectAll(selector) – to select the all elements matching selector.

Like the d3 object, selections has their select and selectAll methods to select descendant.

If selection is a selection, it’s easy to understand what selection.text(), selection.attribute(), selection.style(), selection.insert(), and selection.append() do. But, what does selection.data() do?

Data And Update Selection

The selection’s method data() helps you use the HTML DOM as a database.
selection.data() returns an array of all data that belongs to the elements of the selectionץ The data is held in the property __data__ of the element.
selection.data(arr, func) – defines an update selection and distribute the elements of array arr to the elements of selection.
func(d,i)is a function that:

  • receives d an element of arr and its index i.
  • returns a record key.

If func is not passed, the key is the element’s index.

A recommended way to create an update selection is:
var updSelection = selection1.selectAll(selector).data(arr)

Now, updSelection is a selection of existing elements whose data has been changed.
In addition, updSelection has to methods:

  • updSelection.enter() – returns place holders for elements to be created under selection1.
  • updSelection.exit()– returns elements that have lost their data, and are usually to be removed.

Using the data

The methods attr, style, property, text and data can accept a function as a value to set. The function will be called for each element of the selection’s data. And its arguments will be the array element and its index.

Now, let us see it in an example.
The following code arranges data in a donut layout::

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
<title>Testing Pie Chart</title>
<script type="text/javascript" src="d3.min.js"></script>

<style type="text/css">
.slice text {
font-size: 12pt;
font-family: Arial;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<script type="text/javascript">
var width = 300, 
    height = 300, 
    radius = 100, 
    color = d3.scale.category20c(); //builtin range of colors


// Step 1: creating a container for the donut chart, and attach raw data to it.
var vis = d3.select("body")
            .append("svg")     //create the SVG element inside the <body>
            .datum([{"label":"first", "value":20},
                    {"label":"second", "value":10},
                    {"label":"third", "value":30},
                    {"label":"fourth", "value":25}])       
            .attr({"width": width, "height": height})  
            .append("g")
            .attr("transform", "translate(" + radius + "," + radius + ")") //move the center of the pie chart from 0, 0 to r, r



// Step two: defining the accessors of the layour function. 
//           The function 'pie' will use the 'value' accessor to compute the arc's length.
var pie = d3.layout.pie() 
            .value(function(d) { return d.value; })
            .sort(function(a,b){return a.label<b.label?-1:a.label==b.label?0:1;});

// Step 3: Create the update selection. 
var updateSelection = vis.selectAll("g") 
                         .data(pie);    // This will use the function 'pie' to create arc data from the row data attached to the visualisation element.


// Step 4: Using the data in the update selection to create shape elements.
var arc = d3.svg.arc() 
            .outerRadius(radius)
            .innerRadius(radius / 2)
;
updateSelection.enter()
               .append('g')
               .attr('class','slice')
               .append("path")
               .style("fill", function(d, i) { return color(i); } ) //set the color for each slice to be chosen from the color function defined above
               .attr("d", arc);                                     // Create the arc from the arc data attached to each element.

updateSelection.append("text") 
               .attr("transform", 
                     function(d) { 
                       return "translate(" + arc.centroid(d) + ")"; 
                     })
               .attr("text-anchor", "middle")                  
               .text(function(d, i) { return d.data.label; }); 


</script>
</body>
</html> 

And following is the chart:
enter image description here

For more funcions, see the API Reference.

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How To Develop Firefox Extensions – Files And Directories (Actually Coding It)

In the previous post, How To Develop Firefox Extensions – Intro, we discussed the Chrome document’s DOM. In this post, we’ll learn how to create an add-on that can be installed.  In this post, we’ll learn how to access the Chrome document’s nodes, and to organize an XPI (Cross Platform Installer) file.

XPI files are ZIP files

A file having an ‘.xpi’ suffix, is a compressed file in ‘.zip’ format. If we use Firefox as the opening program for those files, it will install an extension. We can refer to a zipped file as a root directory, containing files and sub-directories.

Following is a recommended directory structure:

  • /
    • install.rdf
    • chrome.manifest
    • content/
      • <filename>.xul
      • <filename>.js
    • locale/
      • <language code>/
        • <filename>.dtd
      • <language code>/
        • <filename>.dtd
      • .
      • .
      • .
    • skin/
      • <filename>.css

The XUL File

The XUL file is located in the content directory. XUL is an acronym for *XML User-interface Language’. The XUL file is a data file that makes the development of Mozilla extensions easier. The following example is an Overlay XUL file, i.e. an XUL used for adding a component to the browser’s Chrome, the great UI container.

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<!DOCTYPE overlay SYSTEM
  "chrome://imageinnewtab_extension/locale/browserOverlay.dtd">

<overlay id="imageinnewtabextensionOverlay"
         xmlns:html="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"
         xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#"
         xmlns="http://www.mozilla.org/keymaster/gatekeeper/there.is.only.xul">

 <script src="imageinnewtab_extension.js">
 </script>

    <menupopup id="contentAreaContextMenu"  >
        <menuitem id="context-imageinnewtab"
                  label="&phpandmoreimageinnewtab.image-new-tab.label;"
                  oncommand="ImageInNewTab.BrowserOverlay.openInNewTab(event)"
                  insertafter="context-viewimage"
                  hidden="true"
                 />
    </menupopup>

</overlay>

This overlay contains the required data for adding an “Open Image In New Tab” option to the context-menu that pops up when you right-click in the HTML document area. This file contains a link to a script and instructions to add a new menu item to the popup menu with the unique id ‘contentAreaContextMenu’.

Note that the value of the label attributes begins with an ampersand(‘&’) and ends with a seni-colons; this means that the value is variable. The actual value is translated according to the definitions found in the DTD file specified in the ‘!DOCTYPE’ tag.

The ‘oncommand’ attribute defines how Firefox should response to command events, i.e. the function called when the menu item is selected either by a mouse click or by a keyboard shortcut.

Learn more about XUL here.

The Javascript file

In this example, ‘content/imageinnewtab_extension.js’, the Javascript file, defines an object that response to the ‘command’ event. The object is initialized as a response to the “load” event, i.e. after the UI components has completed loading. When the Chrome document has completed loading, the new menu item is defined. The ‘init’ member is a function that defines what callback function to call when the context menu pops up.

Following is the code:

if ("undefined" == typeof(ImageInNewTab)) {
  var ImageInNewTab = {};
};

ImageInNewTab.BrowserOverlay = {
    hideIfNoImage: function(event){
      var element=document.popupNode;
      var whatWasClicked = document.getElementById("context-imageinnewtab");
      whatWasClicked.hidden = !(element instanceof Components.interfaces.nsIImageLoadingContent &&
                 element.currentURI);
    },

    init: function (event){
        var contextMenu = document.getElementById("contentAreaContextMenu");
        contextMenu.addEventListener("popupshowing", ImageInNewTab.BrowserOverlay.hideIfNoImage, false);
    },

    openInNewTab: function (event){
      gBrowser.addTab(document.popupNode.src);
    }

}

addEventListener("load",
                 ImageInNewTab.BrowserOverlay.init,false);

The Install RDF file

The ‘install.rdf’ file includes information for the browser. The information includes information shown to the installing end-uder, and for the browser to know if the extension supports the current browser version.

Following is an example:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<RDF xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#" 
     xmlns:em="http://www.mozilla.org/2004/em-rdf#">
    <Description about="urn:mozilla:install-manifest">
        <em:id>imageinnewtab_extension@phpandmore.net</em:id>
        <em:name>Image in New Tab</em:name>
        <em:version>0.1</em:version>
        <em:description>Add a new Menu Item in the context menu to view an image in a new tab.</em:description>
        <em:creator>Amit Yaron</em:creator>
        <em:homepageURL>https://phpandmore.net/</em:homepageURL>
        <em:type>2</em:type> <!-- type=extension --> 

        <em:targetApplication>
           <!-- Firefox -->
           <Description>
                <em:id>{ec8030f7-c20a-464f-9b0e-13a3a9e97384}</em:id>
                <em:minVersion>3.5</em:minVersion>
                <!-- Since Firefox's numbering scheme is unpredictable, users
                are encouraged to edit this field to the current max value.
                -->
                <em:maxVersion>999.0.*</em:maxVersion>
           </Description>
        </em:targetApplication>
    </Description>
</RDF>

Note: don’t change the ’em:id’ tag value.

Learn more about the install.rdf here.

The Chrome Manifest

The ‘chrrome.manifest’ file is a simple text files that contains instructions on how to access Chrome URL addresses (beginning with ‘chrome://’.

Following is an example manifest:

content imageinnewtab_extension content/
skin imageinnewtab_extension classic/1.0 skin/
locale imageinnewtab_extension en-US locale/en-US/
locale imageinnewtab_extension he-IL locale/he-IL/

overlay chrome://browser/content/browser.xul chrome://imageinnewtab_extension/content/imageinnewtab_extension_overlay.xul
  • The ‘content ‘ instruction tells Firefox where to find ‘chrome://imageinnewtab_extension/content’, where the XUL and code are found.
  • The ‘skin ‘ instruction tells Firefox where to find ‘chrome://imageinnewtab_extension/skin’, where the CSS files are found.
  • The ‘locale ‘ instruction tells Firefox where to find ‘chrome://imageinnewtab_extension/locale’ according to the ‘LANG’ environment variable, This is where the DTD file, used for label translation, is found.
  • The ‘overlay’ instruction tells Firefox the role of the overlay XUL file, which extends the great UI container.

Learn more about the manifest here.

The Example Add-on

The example add-on, that opens an image in a new tab, can be downloaded here.

How To Develop a Firefox Extension – Intro

Firefox users can add functionality to their browser by installing an add-on.  To install an add-n click on Tools->Add-ons.

Add On

You can then search for your requested add-on: add-on to download movies from a site, to share a page in Facebook, to add a Delicious bookmark, etc. Another useful add-on is DOM Inspector, which allows you to locate and modify document elements. Firefox add-ons are written in Javascript and access document elements, just like Javascript scripts within HTML documents, except that the document an add-on accesses is named Chrome Document.

Accessing the Chrome Document

The Chrome document contains more than just the “window” element, accessed from a web page using Javascript. Chrome also contains menus, toolbars and other widgets. Let’s make changing one of the Chrome document’s elements your first step in add-on development. If you don’t have DOM Inspector installed in your browser, you can get it here. Now, you can use it to play around a little bit. For example, let’s change the ‘Tools’ menu’s name to ‘Fools’.

To do so, perform the following steps:

  1. Tools->Web Developer->DOM Inspector:
    StartDomInspector
  2. In the DOM Inspector menu bar, choose: File->Inspect Chrome Document->(tab name)
    InspectChromeDocument
  3. In the DOM Inspector Window, click the magnifying-glass icon.
    MagnifyingGlass
  4. In the browser’s window click ‘Tools’ menu
    IMPORTANT! This will NOT work if the “Global Menu BAR Integration” add-on is enabled!!!
  5. Open the DOM Inspector window.
    The ‘tools-menu’ node will appear on the right-hand part of the window.
    tools-menu
    Now, you can see that the value of the node’s “label” attribute is “Tools”
  6. Right click the “Label” attribute, then left-click “Edit”.
    clickEdit
  7. In the “Edit Attributes” window opened change the Node Value and click “OK”.
    editAttributes
  8. Nice work!!!
    niceWork

Congratulations! Now you know how to access chrome elements and modify them. This will help you later when you learn how to do it in Javascript.

Learn more about add-on development here.